For Librarians

Librarians have always been at the forefront of protecting the individual privacy of patrons and ensuring that resources are well-curated and come from credible sources. Publishers share this desire to preserve a safe and trustworthy environment for the exercise of human curiosity for authors and readers.

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As internet technology has evolved, the knowledge, skills, and infrastructure necessary to maintain a trustworthy information ecosystem have changed and continue to expand. The threats to cybersecurity are numerous and there is a real danger that the reputations of institutions and authors will be compromised if the scholarly record is not protected. Publishers and librarians benefit from working together to share intelligence, best practice and to alert users, helping to preserve the integrity of scholarly communication which has been entrusted to libraries and publishers.

The SNSI University Relations Group works to help raise awareness of shared vulnerabilities, discuss challenges and ways to improve the user experience, while providing legitimate access to scholarly content. Participants have all been informally working together for the past few years and collaborating with leading librarians and other key industry stakeholders in order to develop solutions and or ways to mitigate threats to the ecosystem.

Members of the group include:

  • Gwen Evans, VP, Global Library Relations, Research Networks at Elsevier.
  • Helen B. Josephine, Principal, HBJ Associates.
  • Juan P. Denzer, Engineering & Computer Science Librarian, Syracuse University Libraries.
  • Katey Maye, Senior Marketing Director, Wiley.
  • Kathleen P. Neely, Global Marketing Director, Libraries and Institutions, Taylor & Francis.
  • Rick Anderson, University Librarian, Harold B. Lee Library, Brigham Young University.
  • Robert Boissy, Director of Account Development, Springer Nature (Co-Chair).
  • Sharon Mattern Büttiker, Director of Content Management, Research Solutions, Inc.
  • Sari Frances, Dir. of Content Protection Services, Elsevier (Co-Chair).


SNSI invites librarians and publishers, along with other important stakeholders, to contribute their time, ideas, and experience to help maintain a safe, secure, and trustworthy information environment for all. Please contact us with your ideas, concerns, and requests for more information.

Information Security Checklist for Academic Libraries

This was created using comments from participants at a security summit in 2019 co-hosted by Springer Nature, part of SNSI, the Worcester Polytechnic Institute Libraries and the Boston Library Consortium. The summit brought together a diverse group of librarians, corporate information professionals, and academics with an interest in cybersecurity to discuss cybersecurity issues, determine the scope of threats to higher education and the scholarly communications network and begin a dialogue regarding practical steps to make campus records and resources more secure.

The checklist contains information on self-education, support, partnering, and spreading the word about cybersecurity threats in higher education, clearly setting out for librarians the steps they can take to secure their networks.

infographic explaining how to get involved with SNSI

Educate

• Read up on security topics in higher education and scholarly publishing at places like Ren-Isac and The Scholarly Kitchen blog archives.

• EZProxy users, talk to OCLC about their efforts to block/minimize illegal access to licensed content.

Support

• Respond quickly to publisher notices of unauthorized use of their platforms from your institution.

• Support the Coalition for Seamless Access and implement this NISO certified solution for your remote users.

• Seek to make the user experience of library resources as easy as possible – as many users claim to utilize Sci-Hub solely based on ease of use.

• Encrypt all library resources using https for security, including web sites, catalogs and other library tools.

• Make all reasonable efforts to comply with the commitments set out in online access agreements to ensure only those authorized to access content do so.

• Support publishers who make honest efforts to advance the open access movement through transformative deals and publishing models.

Join

• Academic institutions should Join Ren-Isac if they have not already done so.

• Consider joining the EDUCAUSE Security listserv to monitor common issues in higher education security. Visit educause.edu/community/security-community-group

Follow

• Sign-up to the free PSI Registry alerts (psiregistry.org/signup) to be notified of IP addresses known to be used by Sci-Hub to illegitimately access institutional networks.

• Treat Sci-Hub as a persistent threat to your institutional network security.

Spread the Word

• Don’t think higher education is immune from cyber-attack. The education sector is the third largest target of cyber- attacks, ahead of retail.

• Schedule a talk with your head of network security to discuss any library-specific concerns. Share this checklist with your network security staff.

• Give all library staff a sense of responsibility for reporting and acting on security threats when they spot them.

• Treat security as a matter integral to user privacy. Library systems routinely store a tremendous amount of personal data.

• Consider an open forum with students and/or faculty and research staff to discuss Sci-Hub.

• Consider including the dangers related to Sci-Hub use in information literacy and other library outreach programs

infographic explaining how to get involved with SNSI

Educate

• Read up on security topics in higher education and scholarly publishing at places like Ren-Isac and The Scholarly Kitchen blog archives.

• EZProxy users, talk to OCLC about their efforts to block/minimize illegal access to licensed content.

Support

• Respond quickly to publisher notices of unauthorized use of their platforms from your institution.

• Support the Coalition for Seamless Access and implement this NISO certified solution for your remote users.

• Seek to make the user experience of library resources as easy as possible – as many users claim to utilize Sci-Hub solely based on ease of use.

• Encrypt all library resources using https for security, including web sites, catalogs and other library tools.

• Make all reasonable efforts to comply with the commitments set out in online access agreements to ensure only those authorized to access content do so.

• Support publishers who make honest efforts to advance the open access movement through transformative deals and publishing models.

Join

• Academic institutions should Join Ren-Isac if they have not already done so.

• Consider joining the EDUCAUSE Security listserv to monitor common issues in higher education security. Visit educause.edu/community/security-community-group

Follow

• Sign-up to the free PSI Registry alerts (psiregistry.org/signup) to be notified of IP addresses known to be used by Sci-Hub to illegitimately access institutional networks.

• Treat Sci-Hub as a persistent threat to your institutional network security.

Spread the Word

• Don’t think higher education is immune from cyber-attack. The education sector is the third largest target of cyber- attacks, ahead of retail.

• Schedule a talk with your head of network security to discuss any library-specific concerns. Share this checklist with your network security staff.

• Give all library staff a sense of responsibility for reporting and acting on security threats when they spot them.

• Treat security as a matter integral to user privacy. Library systems routinely store a tremendous amount of personal data.

• Consider an open forum with students and/or faculty and research staff to discuss Sci-Hub.

• Consider including the dangers related to Sci-Hub use in information literacy and other library outreach programs

Learn More

If you would like to speak to an SNSI representative to find out more about our activities please contact us.

Reach out
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